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Brian Miller, MD PhD
Principal Investigator

Brian is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and practicing oncologist. He received his AB from Princeton University and MD and PhD degrees from Washington University in St. Louis. He completed his post-doctoral fellowship with Drs. Nick Haining and Arlene Sharpe at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute / Harvard Medical School. His primary research focus is to understand the cellular mechanisms by which immunotherapy controls, or fails to control, tumor growth. During his free time, Brian enjoys chasing after his two small children, jogging, and cooking (sometimes edible) meals.

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Kelly Chong
Research Technician

Wan Lin (Kelly) Chong joined the Miller Lab in summer 2022 after completing her undergraduate degree in Biology at UNC Chapel Hill. During her undergraduate studies, Kelly worked in an onco-immunology lab at UNC to understand the molecular signals controlling T cell functions during cancer. When not in the lab, she can often be found perfecting her Japanese Cotton Cheesecake recipe and learning the guitar. Fun facts about Kelly are that she came from Malaysia, and she can speak three languages!  

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Emily Cox, MS
Research Specialist

Emily joined the Miller lab in February 2022 as a Research Specialist.  She completed her BS in Biology at UNC Wilmington and Masters in Biomedical Science at Texas Tech University, where she studied HIV envelope and co-receptor interactions. Outside of the lab, Emily enjoys baking and reading.

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Katherine Vietor
Research Technician

Kate joined the Miller Lab in summer 2022 as a research technician. She graduated in 2020 from UW-Madison with a BS in Biochemistry. Her previous research topic was studying the maternal to zygotic transition, specifically pioneer factors that open closed chromatin. Outside of the lab, she acts as Game Master for her friends' game of Dungeons and Dragons. 

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Matthew Zimmerman
Graduate Student

Matt is a graduate student in the Cell Biology and Physiology curriculum that joined the Miller Lab in Spring 2022. He graduated from Salisbury University in 2018 with a B.S. in Biology and minors in Chemistry and Mathematics. Prior to beginning graduate school, Matt worked as a research technician studying combination cancer immunotherapies targeting the tumor microenvironment of lung squamous carcinoma in the lab of Dr. Chad Pecot at UNC Chapel Hill. His primary research focus is to uncover myeloid-cell dependent mechanisms of therapeutic resistance in cancer. Outside of lab, Matt enjoys running, hiking, and long walks with his dog Charlie!

Former Mentees

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Rose Al Abosy
Research Technician

Rose worked as a research technician with Brian in Nick Haining’s lab studying subsets of exhausted CD8+ T cells. She is now a medical student at the Boston University School of Medicine.

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Yacine Choutri
Research Technician

Yacine worked as a research technician with Brian in Arlene Sharpe’s lab studying resistance to anti-PD-1. He is now a graduate student at the University of Toronto.

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Jenna Collier
Graduate Student

Jenna is a graduate student in Arlene Sharpe’s lab studying T-cell function in the context of autoimmunity, cancer, and immune-related adverse events that occur during checkpoint blockade immunotherapy.

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Amy Huang
Computational Biologist

Amy is a computational biologist in Arlene Sharpe’s and David Liu’s labs analyzing single-cell and bulk RNA-seq datasets to understand PD-1 biology in tumors and autoimmune disease.

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Raphaelle Toubiana
Computational Biologist

Raphaelle worked with Brian and Dr. Meromit Singer during her master’s thesis at l’Ecole Polytechnique in France to study tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells using single-cell RNA-seq. She is now a graduate student in the Computational Biology and Quantitative Genetics program at Harvard University.

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Sarah Weiss
MD PhD Student

Sarah is an MD PhD student in Arlene Sharpe’s lab studying enhancer regulation of PD-1 in T cells.